This sometimes-overlooked valley has been producing great Chilean wine longer than most other areas of the country. Many of its wineries are certified organic, and the sustainability  of the wine-making process is a central focus. The Maule Valley incorporates the Río Claro Valley, Loncomilla Valley and Tutuvén subregions. Tutuvén is known for its traditional cultivation of grapes using only rain water. The valley has a rich viticultural tradition and is home to many long-standing, family-run vineyards as well as new, innovative wineries crafting some exciting new wines. WHEN TO GO AND FOR HOW LONG? Most wineries offer tours year-round, but the best time to visit is November-April. Harvests begin in early March and...
Read more

This sometimes-overlooked valley has been producing great Chilean wine longer than most other areas of the country. Many of its wineries are certified organic, and the sustainability  of the wine-making process is a central focus. The Maule Valley incorporates the Río Claro Valley, Loncomilla Valley and Tutuvén subregions.

Tutuvén is known for its traditional cultivation of grapes using only rain water. The valley has a rich viticultural tradition and is home to many long-standing, family-run vineyards as well as new, innovative wineries crafting some exciting new wines.

WHEN TO GO AND FOR HOW LONG?

Most wineries offer tours year-round, but the best time to visit is November-April. Harvests begin in early March and last through May.

Given that Maule is about a three hour drive south of Santiago, the best way to experience the valley is to stay a few nights. This allows time for visitors to explore vineyards on foot, bike, or horseback, for example, as well as experience the rich traditions and warm hospitality of the region.

WHERE TO GO? 

  • The Maule Valley sits between the Andes Mountains and Chile’s coastal mountains, making it a destination known for its natural beauty and rural charm in addition to its fame as a producer of excellent wine. In addition to visiting wineries, there are ample opportunities to enjoy hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, and even skiing (in winter, of course). 
  • The most popular wines in Maule include Cabernet Sauvignon, Carménère, Merlot and Malbec. However, Carménère is often thought of as the characteristic wine of this region. Carignan is an old grape which has recently been capturing attention and gaining popularity among winemakers and connoisseurs. The style of winery ranges from old, family-owned operations, to new pioneering wineries.

DON'T MISS

  • A visit to the J. Bouchon winery and overnight stay at the owner’s private family estate, a traditional-style hacienda
  • Bike rides or horseback tours through the vineyards
  • The “Noche del Carmenére” celebrated on the second Saturday in November, where local winemakers gather to choose the Carmenére of the year

 

Read less

Top Experiences in Maule Valley

Best hotels in Maule Valley

Best restaurants in Maule Valley

PARTNERSHIP

Become a Partner

List on Winerist
NEWSLETTER

Join the community