With its blend of German and Roman influences, Alsace boasts a rich natural and cultural heritage. Renowned as the most famous wine route in France, the region is peppered with medieval castles, like Haut-Koenigsbourg, renaissance houses, timber-framed buildings and charming villages. Officially established as a tourist route in 1953, it celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2013 and is an unmissable region for wine connoisseurs and novices alike. Wine lovers can enjoy picturesque journeys through the luscious vineyards, home to fresh and aromatic white wines from bone-dry to lusciously sweet - the perfect accompaniment for a delicious meal. When to go and how long for? You can enjoy Alsace all year round - there is no bad time to go!  ...
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With its blend of German and Roman influences, Alsace boasts a rich natural and cultural heritage. Renowned as the most famous wine route in France, the region is peppered with medieval castles, like Haut-Koenigsbourg, renaissance houses, timber-framed buildings and charming villages. 

Officially established as a tourist route in 1953, it celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2013 and is an unmissable region for wine connoisseurs and novices alike. Wine lovers can enjoy picturesque journeys through the luscious vineyards, home to fresh and aromatic white wines from bone-dry to lusciously sweet - the perfect accompaniment for a delicious meal.

When to go and how long for?

You can enjoy Alsace all year round - there is no bad time to go!  Alsace’s landscape evolves throughout the seasons and the wine route offers many possibilities, so there is always something going on and sights to see.

3 days is just right to visit the Alsace region from north to south, get a real feel for the region and fit in wine tours, tastings and sightseeing.

Where to go?

Take a break in Strasbourg, the capital of Alsace and seat of the European Parliament. The city is a cultural hub offering a superabundance museums, theatres, operas, and beautiful monuments to visit. For an alternative route of discovery, why not cruise along the River Ill on a bateau mouche while enjoying a glass of wine with a meal? 

Foodies will fall in love with the city with its large portions and traditional meals - it’s a haven of culinary delights.

In the centre of the city are the most attractive buildings such as Notre-Dame Cathedral, the Maison Kammerzell, the picturesque district of Petite France, classified as a UNESCO World Heritage site and impressive covered bridges.

Continuing south towards Colmar, and still along the Wine Route, you will still find a series of small villages that seem to have come from fairy tales. Riquewihr and Eguisheim are the prettiest of these villages, with the latter having been voted France’s favourite village.

Colmar is the oldest town in Alsace, famous for its “Little Venice”, and offers both the intimacy of a small town and the rich cultural heritage of a large city. The town is crammed full of typical Alsace timber-framed houses, canals, and its city centre square is decorated with bright flowers. Not only is it the birthplace of the sculptor Bartholdi, the creator of the Statue of Liberty, it is also the hometown of Hansi, the most well known illustrator in Alsace.

Don't miss!

The great Christmas markets of Strasbourg and Colmar which were some of the 1st Christmas markets in the world.

During summer, experience the wine festivals at Mittelbergheim in July and the Crémant festival at Cleebourg in August.

Summer time in Alsace is punctuated by wine celebrations in each villages.

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