The Barossa Valley is one of Australia's best known wine regions and home to some of the oldest Shiraz vines in the world. The region is dotted with the unmistakable presence of a rich Germanic heritage, where the culture is interwoven with modern Australia. It is Australia’s largest premium wine region and ideal for a wine weekend or a longer wine holiday. The Barossa Valley spans approximately 40km long and 30km wide. The Barossa is divided into two official sub-regions – Barossa Valley and Eden Valley (a slightly cooler region). The Barossa is probably best known for its Shiraz, which has a style that can range from full bodied, rich and ripe wines, to more restrained styles. Eden...
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The Barossa Valley is one of Australia's best known wine regions and home to some of the oldest Shiraz vines in the world. The region is dotted with the unmistakable presence of a rich Germanic heritage, where the culture is interwoven with modern Australia. It is Australia’s largest premium wine region and ideal for a wine weekend or a longer wine holiday. The Barossa Valley spans approximately 40km long and 30km wide.

The Barossa is divided into two official sub-regions – Barossa Valley and Eden Valley (a slightly cooler region). The Barossa is probably best known for its Shiraz, which has a style that can range from full bodied, rich and ripe wines, to more restrained styles. Eden Valley is an ideal climate for growing Riesling, made in a very dry style, many of which can age for several decades. The Barossa region has built a strong food culture based on the traits of the original Lutheran settlers. Every town has an array of butchers, bakeries and cheese makers, with the Farmers Market being particularly popular on Saturday morning with locals and visitors.

WHEN TO GO AND FOR HOW LONG?

Barossa (and many parts of South Australia) enjoy a Mediterranean climate, with cool wet winters and warm dry summers. The climate is characterised by four distinct seasons. Harvesting typically starts in early February finishing early April. It is possible to visit all year round, but January/Februaryare by far the hottest and temperatures can climb well into the 40s though more moderate warm days are typical.

To appreciate the culture and get a true sense of the the Barossa Valley 3-4 days would be adequate, but 2 days would be a recommended minimum if staying in the region. There are also many other beautiful wine regions easily accessible to the Barossa as day trips and these can be used to extend your visit in South Australia for as long as you desire.

WHERE TO GO?

  • Wine and food are the main attractions the Barossa region. There are many well-known large volume producers in the area such as PenfoldsWolf Blass and Jacobs Creek, which has an award winning cellar door. In addition, there is also a very strong culture of small boutique producers, which are a great pleasure to discover and these are where the joy and quality of the wines produced are truly revealed. The vast majority of wineries don’t require appointments to visit, but also there are a number of very small producers who are only available by appointment.
  • The main towns to kepp in mind when visiting the Barossa Valley ar Angaston, Nuriootpa and Tanunda with populations of 3,000-5,000. These towns have a good selection of accommodation and other services with good links to smaller towns and to the city of Adelaide. Within the Barossa Ranges there is also a large conservation park which is easily accessible, and is a great way to enjoy the Australian bush land and its fauna (eg. Kangaroos, koalas and many species of indigenous birds). The region is also dotted with many quaint villages which are great to investigate. Here you can discover cafes and wine bars, and shops with a diverse range of local produce. Head down the back streets to explore original homes from the early settlers and for those energetic winerists,  many of the towns are connected by a cycle path, and a number of providers have developed cycle tours ranging from relaxed to more challenging.

 

DON'T MISS!

  • Every March, Barossa has a vintage celebration with various dinners, lunches, and special tastings. But every two years (odd numbered years) the region celebrates with a 10 day Barossa vintage Festival with more than 100 events! The 2013 Barossa Vintage Festival starts on Saturday 30th March and finishes on Sunday 7th April - wine, food, music, art, culture and tradition come together in this regional celebration!
  • Want to be a winemaker for a while? A couple of wineries have established experiences where visitors can put on a lab coat, and blend their own wine. This enables visitors to learn how blends are assembled, and how changes to the blend affect the final wine.
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